Still finding home mainly in abstraction and minimalism, Rain's current focus is on original sculptures inspired by animal and nature themes.  Rain's previous works have been mostly abstractions of nature on canvas, with elements of human presence as a part of nature. These nature-centric scenes often include hints of homelike or other human-made structures.


Her works have been shown in the USA and Australia and are in various private collections throughout the world, including New York, California, the PNW, and Australia. Several have also been featured in Saatchi-curated collections at Saatchi Art, as well as on several book covers.   

 

Rain Jordan holds a BA and an MFA from the California State University.  She is also an author and a certified canine behavior consultant.  Born and raised in the San Francisco Bay area of California, Rain currently resides on the north Oregon coast.

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Artist's Statement:  Marine and Land Animal Conservation

 

I’m as flawed as the next person. Over the years, I’ve had various “pets” – and over the years they’ve delivered important, sometimes difficult lessons.  However much I will always be drawn to the non-human animals of the earth, and although I am still the grateful guardian of certain companioned animals, I am ultimately concerned with ensuring significant improvements to their existence.

 

Anyone who has ever lived with a dog knows that as a species, they are among the most open, responsive creatures on the planet.  My work in dog rescue, rehabilitation, and animal protection is part of my history for their sake.  I see my art as not just self-expression, but also as another vehicle of representation.

 

The essence of sea anemones and other ocean life seems to me an always evolving marriage of toughness and delicacy. Although sea anemones may seem fragile, manhandling one can induce a powerful sting. Whether of self-defense, as when humans or marine predators touch them, or of offense, as that required for them to access sustenance, both smaller, faster moving creatures and larger, boorishly moving ones soon learn that very little in the world is as it seems.

 

The captivating beauty of sea life is undeniable, and it’s no surprise that people sometimes wish to keep that beauty close. Instead of taking these animals from their homes, my hope is that we become satisfied to recall and re-present our meetings with them by taking only their artistic representations into our own homes.

As the poet Emily Dickinson wrote, "the truth must dazzle gradually."